BMW of course he did motorcycle the world to sit up and pay attention to The first generation S1000RR in 2009: he rewrote many of the rules of sports motorcycles with one stroke. Designed specifically to give BMW a shot at the World Superbike Championship, it hasn’t been a huge success, but BMW is on target and its next weapon is the M1000RR, the first bike to wear BMW’s famous ‘M’ badge.


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10/10 Less weight, more power

The M1000RR features many small but significant changes to both the chassis and engine. The goal was less weight and more power, and it was achieved. The engine is lighter, the frame is lighter, and so are the wheels, which are made of carbon fiber. The titanium Akrapovic exhaust alone saves a whopping eight pounds of weight. The engine produces a claimed 205 horsepower (independent dyno tests showed 160 horsepower at the rear wheel) and revs 500 rpm higher than the S1000RR. However, the entire M1000RR has been designed to unlock power and performance through race spec tuning changes,

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9/10 Engine

The internals of the engine have been changed to allow it to rev higher and improve the torque curve (torque is the same as S1000RR at 83 lb-ft). It uses BMW’s Shiftcam phase shift system, but the S1000RR has that too. What it doesn’t have are M’s lightweight Pankl connecting rods, low-friction Mahle pistons, a higher compression ratio, and lots of lightweight parts like the fingers that actuate the valves. While all of these modifications don’t increase power and torque over the S1000RR, they will allow the engine to be race-tuned to deliver more power on the race track, which is, after all, the reason the M1000RR exists in first place time.

8/10 Chassis

The M1000RR engine is a stressed member of the chassis, adding stiffness while reducing weight due to the loss of some chassis tubes. The angle of the front fork is lengthened and the wheelbase is slightly longer. Weight distribution has also changed, with 52.1 percent of the 423 pounds of weight going to the front wheel, compared to 53.8 percent on the S1000RR. The overall dimensions of the “M” chassis are smaller: it is narrower and lighter than the S1000RR chassis, which improves ergonomics and helps reduce squat under acceleration and sharp roll under braking.

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7/10 Suspension

Martsok supplies suspension components for the M1000RR, but it’s actually a lot simpler than other track bikes. Often modern fork systems have dozens of clicks to adjust rebound, damping and compression, but the forks on the M1000RR only have ten clicks for each adjustment, while the rear shock has a seven-position preload adjustment. Having said that, you need to be on your A-game to feel the difference between a single click of any compression setting (or any setting for that matter!)

6/10 You will need a degree to understand electronics

The M1000RR’s electronic driver aids are terrifyingly complex, and there are thousands of permutations for engine power, engine braking, traction control, ABS and wheel control, all of which are configurable via the TFT instrument panel and controlled by the six-axis mechanism. internal unit of measurement. There’s launch control and even a pit lane speed limiter for the full race experience. Naturally, the two-way quick-shift lever makes shifting no more difficult than pushing a hot knife through butter. Not quite the expected hill hold control, cruise control (for those extra long straights…) and even heated grips (for winter racing…).

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5/10 Aerodynamics

What would an advanced superbike be without wings? The M1000RR wings on the front of the fairing are taken straight from World Superbikes and add 30 pounds of downforce up front and six pounds in the rear at 286 mph. At low speeds, they stop the lift of the front wheel when accelerating out of corners, and when entering corners, they contribute to stability under braking. Even if 186mph isn’t the kind of speed you’ll be hitting on the road, aerodynamics will still help you, even if it just helps you look cool!

4/10 Brakes

The calipers are marked with the BMW “M” logo, but are actually made by Nissin. The initial bite is aggressive, but after that they feel a little wooden, which won’t be a problem for someone who isn’t a World Superbike or MotoGP rider, or someone who isn’t going to take to the track. In the real world, the brakes are more than powerful enough for any situation, and BMW specifies two different pad combinations – one for track riding and one for street riding.

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3/10 Incredible agility

The overall weight loss, along with the geometry changes, helps with handling, but what really makes the M1000RR worth the price are the carbon fiber wheels, which shed 3.7 pounds from the unsprung weight. Ironically not race-legal, the carbon rims do their best to change direction: the steering is super light, and you won’t be surprised if you turn too aggressively and quickly on your first exploratory laps and find yourself on the rumble of the lane on the inside of a corner. You will soon learn that there are minimal investments required to change direction. For even more adjustability, the pivot point of the rocker arm can be slightly altered, and while most of us won’t notice the difference, the truly gifted will be able to adjust the steering to their heart’s desire.

2/10 Rivals

BMW would have you believe that the only real rival might be the M1000RR Ducati Superleggera, that other completely uncompromising (and expensive!) superbike. However, in reality, for most of us, the M1000RR’s competition is any modern liter superbike from any manufacturer. The performance parameters of any of the bikes on the list are superior to the vast majority of owners: you will be just as fast on Suzuki GSX-R1000 how will you be on the M1000RR. The competition won’t give you a sense of exclusivity: only 500 M1000RRs will be produced to match, so taking one to the track will put you in a class of its own, whether or not you can ride it all the way. or not!

1/10 So, how much does it cost?

So, here is ruble. The BMW S1000RR, which is already more of a bike than many of us could handle, will set you back $16,995, which is pretty impressive in terms of price. If you want to add carbon fiber wheels, that adds another $4,500. However, upgrading to the M1000RR will double your investment and then some: $36,995 is the asking price. Yes, you could justify the extra cost if you add up all the engine development costs and all the gimmicks like the titanium connecting rods and Akrapovic exhaust and so on, and for some people the price won’t be an obstacle. In reality, the S1000RR is a smart choice, but the problem is that we ride motorcycles: any sensitivity disappeared years ago when we first threw a leg over a bike. With that in mind, the M1000RR must be celebrated as the pinnacle of motorcycle design and performance.

FAQ

Q: How much horsepower does the BMW M1000RR have?

BMW claims 205 horsepower, but the rear wheel figure is 160 horsepower.

Q: How much does the BMW M1000RR cost?

The BMW M1000RR costs $36,995.

Q: Which is faster BMW S1000RR or M1000RR?

The BMW S1000RR and M1000RR produce the same amount of power. The M1000RR has more revs, but you need to be a skilled rider to make the M1000RR go faster around the track than the S1000RR.

Q: How much horsepower does the BMW M1000RR have?

BMW claims 205 horsepower, but the rear wheel figure is 160 horsepower.

Q: How much does the BMW M1000RR cost?

The BMW M1000RR costs $36,995.

Q: Which is faster BMW S1000RR or M1000RR?

The BMW S1000RR and M1000RR produce the same amount of power. The M1000RR has more revs, but you need to be a skilled rider to make the M1000RR go faster around the track than the S1000RR.

https://www.topspeed.com/10-reasons-why-the-bmw-m1000rr-is-the-ultimate-superbike/

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